Here’s the latest in David Wyatt's beautiful Local Characters series, inspired by the people who live in our Dartmoor village. This one, called “A Winter Lamentation,” is a mythic portrait of fellow-artist Rima Staines. (Tilly & I were honored to be part of the series a few years ago, and there have been many more magical paintings since then.)
David explaines the name: “A couple of years ago there was a funeral fire for Thomas, husband of Lunar, where Rima played the flute beautifully on a cold winter’s afternoon. This picture has been haunting me ever since, so it was good to finally get it down.”
To see more of his work, including the rest of the Local Characters series, visit his website,  illustration blog, and Etsy shop.

Here’s the latest in David Wyatt's beautiful Local Characters series, inspired by the people who live in our Dartmoor village. This one, called “A Winter Lamentation,” is a mythic portrait of fellow-artist Rima Staines. (Tilly & I were honored to be part of the series a few years ago, and there have been many more magical paintings since then.)

David explaines the name: “A couple of years ago there was a funeral fire for Thomas, husband of Lunar, where Rima played the flute beautifully on a cold winter’s afternoon. This picture has been haunting me ever since, so it was good to finally get it down.”

To see more of his work, including the rest of the Local Characters series, visit his website,  illustration blog, and Etsy shop.

neil-gaiman

theothershiroki:

Here are a few pictures from my dissertation ^^

As I mentioned in a few posts before, I illustrated Instructions by Neil Gaiman. All the images were exposed in an enclosed space to separate the realm of fairy tales from our mundane world. So yeah…I pitched a tent in the middle of the gallery XD

I really love this — particularly as Neil’s splendid poem, “Instructions,” was first published in The Wolf at the Door, a fairy tale anthology that I co-edited with Ellen Datlow. You can read the poem online here (in the Journal of Mythic Arts archives), and there’s also a gorgeous illustrated book version, with art by Charles Vess.

"We need another and a wiser and perhaps a more mystical concept of animals. Remote from universal nature and living by complicated artifice, man in civilization surveys the creature through the glass of his knowledge and sees thereby a feather magnified and the whole image in distortion. We patronize them for their incompleteness, for their tragic fate for having taken form so far below ourselves. And therein do we err. For the animal shall not be measured by man. In a world older and more complete than ours, they move finished and complete, gifted with the extension of the senses we have lost or never attained, living by voices we shall never hear. They are not brethren, they are not underlings: they are other nations, caught with ourselves in the net of life and time, fellow prisoners of the splendour and travail of the earth.”
- Henry Beston (The Outermost House)

Illustration by Virginia France Sterrett (1900-1931)

"We need another and a wiser and perhaps a more mystical concept of animals. Remote from universal nature and living by complicated artifice, man in civilization surveys the creature through the glass of his knowledge and sees thereby a feather magnified and the whole image in distortion. We patronize them for their incompleteness, for their tragic fate for having taken form so far below ourselves. And therein do we err. For the animal shall not be measured by man. In a world older and more complete than ours, they move finished and complete, gifted with the extension of the senses we have lost or never attained, living by voices we shall never hear. They are not brethren, they are not underlings: they are other nations, caught with ourselves in the net of life and time, fellow prisoners of the splendour and travail of the earth.”

- Henry Beston (The Outermost House)

Illustration by Virginia France Sterrett (1900-1931)